woody meristem
Although this has been discussed before, I'll open this can of worms again. Today I pulled the card from one of my white-flash S40 builds and found a good photo of one of the nicest 8-point bucks we have around here that was taken early this morning. He was in a classic pose that almost looks like it was a set-up -- but it's not. Unfortunately, as with almost any flash picture where the critter is facing the camera, he had Little-Orphan-Annie eyes. White-tailed Deer - A.jpg
With a minimum of editing I got rid of the white-eyes and made the photo, and the buck, look much more appealing.
White-tailed Deer - B.jpg 

This editing was done using a photo editing program that is a free download -- PhotoScape -- that's available for both Windows and Mac operating systems. PhotoScape can do a lot more than just paint over white-eyes and is well worth trying.

For those who think it's unethical to edit photos I'll say -- just look at the differences in colors that many of us see with our eyes/brain and the colors of the same subject in digital photographs. And look at what Ansel Adams, probably the finest landscape photographer who has ever lived, did with his photos -- and said --
From harpree tkhara.com.jpg - 2.jpg 

Some folks will never edit their photos, some will make all kinds of changes; as for me, I'll continue to minimally edit.
http://forestandfield.blogspot.com/
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IroquoisArcher
Nice picture.
Thanks for the link Woody. Another free one I use is IrfanView. Assuming it allows the same stuff to be done. Is what I use almost exclusively.
I'm with you on the editing...to a point. I believe you feel this way too. I'll crop down to size I want as long as it doesn't cause loss of clarity. I'll usually then do auto adjust of the colors just to bring the details slightly sharper, anything over slightly I don't do. Also allows me to use the auto adjust feature to lighten/darken the picture to better make something out.
When you are in a difficult situation and wonder where God is; remember the Teacher is always quiet during the test.
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zaj56
I edit minimally also ...usually just brightness. Also, the programs like IrfanView and photoscape...do they operate similar to photobucket? Photobucket can sometimes be a PITA..so I'm looking to try something else.
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woody meristem
I've never used Photobucket. I have used Picasa (which is really limited, but quick and easy), PhotoStudio (which used to come free with Canon cameras, is very versatile but not as easy to use as PhotoScape), Seashore and Gimp (both similar and very versatile but a real pain to use -- I hardly ever use either anymore).

PhotoStudio gives you options to adjust colors, exposure, backlighting, saturation, sharpness and contrast; to add text and shapes; to crop and resize photos; to clone part of a photo. There are other adjustments available, but I don't use them.
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Vonfoust
So far all I have done is crop which really has helped get a few rain drops out or to focus more on the subject where I had the camera angled a little oddly.  I messed around once with whatever is on my computer, still not sure what it is.  It's on Windows 7 and lets me goof around with the photos.  I generally have found myslef making htem look worse though. 
When I look at the smiles on all the children's faces, I just know they're about to jab me with something.
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wvridgerunner
Is there a tutorial you followed to edit those glowing eyes woody? The end result of your pic is amazing. I have a mac, so I usually use Photoshop CS6, or the built in iPhoto software. I've never thought about getting rid of the eye shine, but that'd be a great technique to learn. I usually just do a bit of brightening on some of my s40 nighttime pics, and the occasional cropping here or there.
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woody meristem
No tutorial (although they may have one on their website) I just played around with the program until I learned to do what I wanted to do. For that photo I used PhotoScape which allows you to zoom in on a portion of a photo. Then used the "Paint" feature to go around the white-eye with black until I was satisfied with the size of the white that was left. You can adjust the size of the paintbrush and use a wide array of colors. It's not hard to do and doesn't take long if the edge of the white is pretty sharp, on some photos the edge of the white is diffuse and I've never had much luck eliminating that and ending up with it looking better than in the original.

Hate to say it, but the PhotoScape version I have on our Windows computer is easier to use than the version on my Mac although you can do the same editing on both. There are newer versions of PhotoScape but I've never bothered to install them since I can do most of what I want with the version I have.

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wvridgerunner
woody meristem wrote:
No tutorial (although they may have one on their website) I just played around with the program until I learned to do what I wanted to do. For that photo I used PhotoScape which allows you to zoom in on a portion of a photo. Then used the "Paint" feature to go around the white-eye with black until I was satisfied with the size of the white that was left. You can adjust the size of the paintbrush and use a wide array of colors. It's not hard to do and doesn't take long if the edge of the white is pretty sharp, on some photos the edge of the white is diffuse and I've never had much luck eliminating that and ending up with it looking better than in the original.

Hate to say it, but the PhotoScape version I have on our Windows computer is easier to use than the version on my Mac although you can do the same editing on both. There are newer versions of PhotoScape but I've never bothered to install them since I can do most of what I want with the version I have.



Ok thanks woody,
I'm fairly proficient in photoshop cs6, I can soften wrinkles on people, change eye colors, remove blemishes etc. I've dabble with that software for a few yrs, and still have only really learned the basics of what it do.  I'll do some searching and see if there are any tutorials on reducing the reflection/glowing eyes of an animal. In photoshop, you work in layers, and make adjustments using layer masks, so the original photo stays unaltered if one were to "mess up" too bad.

I agree though, minimal editing is always best, but sometimes it's just necessary to make a photo POP. The difference in your photo in the OP is night and day, removing the glowing eyes made it much better imo. I'm amazed at one some of the homebrew photography masters can do, especially when using a DSLR and a couple slave flashes. I might never get to their skill level, but just learning some editing techniques that increase the quality of my photos is definitely something I want to work on. Next year, I wanna try to get at least 1 really good photo every month, and use them to make a 2018 homebrew pic calendar to give to a few friends/family members as Christmas gifts. Keep up the good work and thanks for all your help! I still wanna make a couple of those steel boxes like you use, just another thing I haven't gotten around to doing.
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IroquoisArcher
wvridgerunner wrote:


Ok thanks woody,
I'm fairly proficient in photoshop cs6, I can soften wrinkles on people, change eye colors, remove blemishes etc. I've dabble with that software for a few yrs, and still have only really learned the basics of what it do.  I'll do some searching and see if there are any tutorials on reducing the reflection/glowing eyes of an animal. In photoshop, you work in layers, and make adjustments using layer masks, so the original photo stays unaltered if one were to "mess up" too bad.

I agree though, minimal editing is always best, but sometimes it's just necessary to make a photo POP. The difference in your photo in the OP is night and day, removing the glowing eyes made it much better imo. I'm amazed at one some of the homebrew photography masters can do, especially when using a DSLR and a couple slave flashes. I might never get to their skill level, but just learning some editing techniques that increase the quality of my photos is definitely something I want to work on. Next year, I wanna try to get at least 1 really good photo every month, and use them to make a 2018 homebrew pic calendar to give to a few friends/family members as Christmas gifts. Keep up the good work and thanks for all your help! I still wanna make a couple of those steel boxes like you use, just another thing I haven't gotten around to doing.


I do this every year with the family (usually family related photos) and one for my friends archery shop. These are all exclusively my cams pictures (well sometimes one of someone with a nice harvested buck...like the 9 yr. old girl who got a monster with a single shot 20 guage!) and they look forward to it every year (plus the guys who say their cams take just as good pics. are then floored by the quality shots!). On these just to personalize it I guess I get Kodak (any type works but I use this) double side photo paper in matte finish. Gloss just seems to smear and is too shiny for me. Print up the dates side first, remember to add holidays/solstices/daylight savings/etc. After this make sure you have the paper in right (mine feeds in with the printed calendar side up and turned 180 degrees). I use medium quality due to cost of ink and make sure I use matte paper choice. After done I go to Staples and have them spiral bind (is alot better then the punched binding I feel) and put the hole to hang them up by. I also just use card stock and print Dec. on since it has no pic. on the back plus use the card stock as the first one with the persons name on it and usually get the clear cover too. With cost of ink I usually figure I have slightly over $20.00 each. If my ink runs out anymore it is cheaper to just buy a new printer and continue!

Do a google search for IrfanView and there is a free download. Never used any of the others so can't compare but it lets me do all kinds of red eye fixing (shows how) and also if something is in the pic. you'd rather not have there is a copying feature with size choices to copy and paste over what you want out. Takes a bit of trial and error to get it just right, I usually really enlarge the pic. and get as close as I can and when put to normal size it is hardly, if any, noticable.
When you are in a difficult situation and wonder where God is; remember the Teacher is always quiet during the test.
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