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Gumby

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Reply with quote  #21 
I love all the reasons posted above but my favorite one is when you can fix it yourself and have your cam back out in a day or so versus 6 months waiting on a replacement or repair. I always get guys asking me if I can fix their commercial cam too....and I tell them to throw it away and build their own. So far not one guy has taken my advice. LOL!!
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IroquoisArcher

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Reply with quote  #22 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gumby
I love all the reasons posted above but my favorite one is when you can fix it yourself and have your cam back out in a day or so versus 6 months waiting on a replacement or repair. I always get guys asking me if I can fix their commercial cam too....and I tell them to throw it away and build their own. So far not one guy has taken my advice. LOL!!


Have had 3 guys ask me to repair their cams. 1 got working as had corrosion all over boards but turning on was about it. Another a bear got so it was toast. One a week ago was just corrosion on the battery terminals...he thinks I am an expert in fixing stuff now.

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pdskal

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Reply with quote  #23 
I don't know where to start with this question, all positive experiences I've had building over the years.  I've taught myself everything in regard to building and I think many folks just don't want to take the time and teach themselves.  So the state of homebrews?  In my opinion, us members of home-brew community have to make things as simple as possible for new consumers to jump into the hobby.  We have great suppliers and dedicated people offering their time for the good of the hobby.  I want to say Thank you to those involved in providing supplies and/or service!  

With that being said, I think we need to step up and do more exploring with newer camera equipment including image capture sensors, lenses and flash photography.  White flash, including DSLR setups blow away commercial cams.  But how many white flash commercial cams are really being used?  Consumers are convinced they need invisible flash, I'm actually one of them....at certain times/setups.  You guys see my builds,  99% IR, maybe a few white flash setups.  If I can utilize black flash (940nm) or close to I will experiment.  We need to experiment with LED arrays for flash photography.  No big capacitors and no refresh needed.  Xenon flash tubes work great but let's think about the future.  LED's are energy efficient and when driven properly can illuminate nicely.  This is where I think we can take a chapter out of the commercial cam world?  How are they driving their LED's?  We should be able to improve illumination by home brewing arrays and pulse drivers.

I"ve been typing fast and wanted to throw a few thoughts out there.  Don't over analyze my comments, just wanted to chime in, food for thought.  Also, it is hard for me to make too many comparisons as I don't even own ONE commercial cam!  100% home-brews.  I just go by what my buddies are utilizing and telling me.  I know it's tough to  make judgements on second-hand stories, but I just can't bring myself to go buy a commercial cam just to compare to my home-brews.  Every time I show "the neighbors" my IR pics, jaws, drops.   

I don't know if any of this makes sense, but it sounds good to me.  [tongue]

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zaj56

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Reply with quote  #24 
In a nutshell...I think the "state of homebrews" is doing quite well and with the knowledge and ingenuity of the brewers, the future is quite bright. Comparing us with strictly commercial cam users is really not a good comparison....apples to oranges! Hombrewers take pride in creating and repairing their cams and the quality of their pictures  while most commercial camera users are mainly concerned with using their cams as scouting tools.(homebrewers certainly do that too) Don...who has been a homebrew mentor to me ..recently told me that homebrews aren't for everybody, and I have to totally agree with that....maybe that makes us all a little special LOL
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woody meristem

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Reply with quote  #25 
Making a homebrewed trail camera is like making your own furniture or baking your own bread, after a few mistakes and disasters you get pretty good at it. Then what you make for yourself is better than than the vast majority of what you can purchase and gives you a great deal of satisfaction besides. Most folks couldn't be bothered doing things for themselves and are happy with what they can buy even if it's not as good as what some of us make. Other people are just afraid of making a mistake and would rather not try -- too bad.
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buckshot164

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Reply with quote  #26 
I have never been a big ir person and it shows.  I do use some IR cameras and video recorders.  I have not done a lot of ir stuff lately.  You can buy led flashes for cameras but I have not seen anyone mess with them.  I have thought about it.  I have been playing with a Olympus vg series cameras because of the flash and hd video.  This takes so much time to test and see what works.  More time than people think.  I have been happy to see hack videos and new hacks being shown on this sight,  Do we need to setup a testing group.
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